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Great Great Grandfather George Right Smith, 1st Lieutenant, Company H - Rowland Highlanders, 18th Georgia Regiment of Volunteer Infantry, I Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
George Right Smith, 1st Lieutenant
Company H "Rowland Highlanders"
18th Ga Regiment of Vol Infantry
This part of my site is dedicated to those members of my family, who like so many in their time....answered the call of their beloved country. A call to arms, a call to fight against the invader from the North. Some gave their life, some like my Great Great Grandfather suffered sickness, wounds and starvation...but continued to carry the fight to the enemy. Here I list the names and service of the sons of John J. Smith...brothers in blood and brothers in arms. Fine Southern Soldiers....every one.

Also listed are the names of other family members who served the South from our extended Virginia family on our Grandmother Elizabeth Ghiselin Smith's side.



Georgia State Flag
FAMILY ROLL of HONOR

Battle Flag believed to be owned and carried by War Time Georgia Governor, Joe E. Brown
Battle Flag owned by War Time Georgia Governor,
Joe E. Brown (Founder of the Georgia State Line)
Held in Exhibit by the National Park Service

Seaborn Smith - b 1819 - Drummer, Company F "Georgia Blues", First Regiment, Georgia State Line, Stovall's Brigade, Army of the Tennessee d 18 Apr 1863 near Charleston, SC.

James Monroe Smith - b 8 Apr 1821 Jackson County, Ga - First Sergeant, Company F "Georgia Blues", First Regiment, Georgia State Line, Stovall's Brigade, Army of the Tennessee - saw action at Kennesaw Mountain and the Battle of Atlanta.

28th Alabama Infantry Regimental Flag
28th Alabama Infantry
Regimental Flag


Great Great Great Uncle Francis Marion Smith, Private, Company G, 28th Alabama Regiment of Infantry
Francis Marion Smith, Private, Company G
28th Alabama Regiment of Infantry
Francis Marion Smith - b 18 March 1823 Cass County, Ga - enlisted in the 28th Alabama Volunteer Infantry, Co. G; Manigault's Brigade, on 26 February 1862, in Shelby Springs, Alabama. Saw action in Chickamaugua, at Murfreesboro, Peachtree Creek, Cassville, Resacca, and the Battle of Atlanta.

58th Alabama Infantry Regimental Flag
58th Alabama Infantry
Regimental Flag
John Newton Smith - b 1830 - Company G, 58th Regiment "Blue Mountain Rifles", Alabama Volunteers - served 15 Mar 1862 - late 1864 when he was forced home by Typhoid Fever.


Eugene Greene Smith - b 1832 - Company F "Georgia Blues", First Regiment, Georgia State Line, Stovall's Brigade, Army of the Tennessee - saw action at Peachtree Creek, Kennesaw Mountain, and the Battle of Atlanta.


18th Georgia Regiment of Volunteer Infantry Battle Flag while with Hood's Brigade
18th Georgia Regiment of Volunteer Infantry
Battle Flag while with Hood's Brigade
George Right Smith - b 1837 - Company H, 18th Georgia Regiment of Volunteer Infantry, "Rowland Highlanders". Enlisted as a Private, elected to 2nd and then 1st Lieutenant; wounded twice during the war, once at Cold Harbor and once at Chancellorsville. d. 1903

Monument on grave site of George R. Smith, located at the Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery in Sonoraville. Georgia
Monument of George R. Smith, 1st Lieutenant
18th Georgia Regiment of Volunteer Infantry
Company H, "Rowland Highlanders"
(Photo: Courtesy of John Strickland, III)

Lemuel Smith - b 1842 - Corporal (Color Bearer) Company F "Georgia Blues", First Regiment, Georgia State Line, Stovall's Brigade, Army of the Tennessee - saw action at Peachtree Creek, Kennesaw Mountain, and the Battle of Atlanta. d. July 1864 from wounds received during the Battle of Atlanta.


Moses Anderson - Company E, 23rd Georgia Regiment of Volunteer Infantry, d. July, 1 1862 during the Battle of Malvern Hill. Moses Anderson was the Grandfather of Joseph Anderson who married Fannie Ethel Smith, daughter of George Right Smith (my Great Great Grandfather)


Virginia State Flag of the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues, presented to them by the Ladies of Norfolk in 1861
Virginia State Flag of the
Norfolk Light Artillery Blues
Norman Bell - Was born on August 30, 1844; son of Alexander Bell and Margaret Soutter Bell. He attended Norfolk Academy before enlisting in the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues. He served with the "Blues" for approximately six months, until he was reassigned to special duty as a clerk on the Headquarters Staff of General Robert E. Lee. He often served as secretary to General Lee and was the scriber of the now famous General Order No. 9 (General Lee's Farewell Address). He was parolled as a part of a detail under Captain G. W. Shell at Appomattox, then returned to Norfolk on May 27, 1865. Norman Bell died in Norfolk, Virginia on 20 October 1916. He was living at 210 W. Freemason Street, Norfolk, Virginia at the time of his death and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery. He was our 2nd Cousin, 4 times removed.


6th Virginia Infantry Regiment Battle Flag
6th Virginia Infantry Regiment
Battle Flag
James N. Bell - Was born on August 09, 1839; son of Alexander Bell and Margaret Soutter Bell. Served in the 6th Virginia Regiment of Infantry that was a part of the five companies composing the 3rd Battalion of the 54th Regiment of Virginia Militia, the others being the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues, the Independent Grays, the Norfolk Junior Volunteers and Company F, the latter company being organized in 1859. James Nichol Bell served as color-sergeant and was wounded in the Peninsula campaign, losing partial use of his arm and several fingers. He passed away on January 26, 1890, buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery, across the street from Elmwood Cemetery. His grave has a CSA maker indicating that he was a part of the Virginia 6th. He is buried in the Soutter family plot along w/his parents, wife (Fannie) and other various family members. He was our 2nd Cousin, 4 times removed.


Robert Soutter Bell - Was born on March 21, 1834; son of Alexander Bell and Margaret Soutter Bell. He served as a 1st Lieutenant in Hokes's N.C. Brigade. He was held as a prisoner of war on Johnson's Island. The famed POW camp was the only Union prison exclusively for Southern officers. During its three years of operation, more than 15,000 men were incarcerated there. 1st Lieutenant R. S. bell passed away on July 18, 1905. He was our 2nd Cousin, 4 times removed.


Douglas Bell - Was born January 25, 1841; son of Alexander Bell and Margaret Soutter Bell. Served in the 6th Virginia Regiment of Infantry, Company G., holding the rank of Private. Died May 1898 in Baltimore, Maryland. He was our 2nd Cousin, 4 times removed.


Alexander T. Bell - Was born on December 12, 1835; son of Alexander Bell and Margaret Soutter Bell. He served in the 3rd Regiment of Virginia Cavalry (Stuart's Cavalry), holding the rank of Assistant Surgeon, as an Officer. He was captured during the fall of Richmond, Va. and was held at Libby's Prison. After the occupation of Richmond in 1865 the prison was used by Union authorities for detaining former Confederate officers. A.T. Bell died February 14, 1913 in Norfolk, Virginia. He was our 2nd Cousin, 4 times removed.


Thomas Knox Bell - Born on December 28, 1845; son of Alexander Bell and Margaret Soutter Bell. Served under General Joseph E. Johnston, in the ordinance department. He was surrendered with General Johnston at Greensboro, N. C. The surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston's Confederate Army to General William T. Sherman at the Bennett Place, Greensboro N. C. on April 26, 1865, was the second and last major stage in the peace making process which ended the War Between the States. T. K. Bell passed away on November 30, 1895. He was our 2nd Cousin, 4 times removed.


Robert Soutter Broughton - son of Thomas G. Broughton and Jean Soutter was born in 1841, enlisted in the "Blues" on June 4, 1861 and was promoted to 4th Corporal on November 5, 1862. He was wounded on April 2, 1865 during the fall of Petersburg and was sent to hospital in Lynchburg to recuperate. He was paroled from the hospital about one week after General Lee's surrender at Appomattox. He was a business man in Norfolk after the war and was instrumental in reorganizing the "Blues" as a militia unit after the Union government turned over city government back to our folks in 1871. He died March 7, 1916 and is buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery in Norfolk. Our second great grand uncle.


John Dyson Ghiselin - Company C, 54th Virginia Militia. Our Great Great Grandfather on our maternal Grandmother Elizabeth Ghiselin Smith's side.


Horace Ghiselin - Was born in 1841 to John and Catherine Ghiselin and enlisted on March 10, 1862, Company C, 54th Virginia Militia; later in Company H, 16th Virginia Infantry, served under Captain Grandy in the "Norfolk Light Artillery Blues" of General Garnett's Division in General Hill's Corps. He served with the "Blues" throughout the entire war, with the exception of a few months in the fall and winter of 1863 when he was confined to Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond, Va. and again for a shorter period in December of 1864. When Richmond fell, he was captured in a hospital and transferred to Jackson Hospital as a prisoner. Paroled from that hospital on April 20, 1865. Brother to John Dyson Ghiselin listed above, making Horace our 2nd Great Grand Uncle.


Richard Ghiselin - Was born on May 22, 1843, son of John D. and Mary T. Ghiselin. Enlisted on April 18, 1861, Company H, 16th Virginia Infantry, served under Captain Grandy in the "Norfolk Light Artillery Blues" of General Garnett's Division in General Hill's Corps. He served with the "Blues" throughout the entire war, until on April 2, 1865, during the collapse of the defenses around Petersburg, was taken prisoner and sent to City Point and then Point Lookout. Here, he remained until June 12, 1865 when he took the oath of alliegence and was released. He returned to Norfolk, Va. where he died on March 10, 1909 at the age of 65. Brother to John Dyson Ghiselin listed above, making Richard our 2nd Great Grand Uncle.


Henry Ghiselin - Company A, 54th Virginia Militia. Brother to John Dyson Ghiselin listed above, making Henry our 2nd Great Grand Uncle.


William Thorowgood Nimmo - was born on 26 May 1827 in Norfolk, Virginia; son of Colonel James Robinson Nimmo (1787-1841) and Elizabeth Tunstall McCandlish (1791- ). He was a Lieutenant in the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues, even before the Civil War. He died on 25 September 1861 at Sewell's Point, Norfolk, Virginia, at age 34; of "camp fever". Sewell's Point is now on the grounds of the Norfolk Naval Air Station. He was our 2nd Cousin, 4 times removed.


Powhatan Ellis Nimmo - was born in 1837 in Norfolk, Virginia; son of John Ingraham Nimmo (1803- ) and Margaret Browne (1815- ). He was aged 23 when he enlisted as a private with the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues on 23 March 1861 in Norfolk, Virginia but he does not appear on the rolls of that unit until after June 10, 1861. He married Margaret K Butt on 5 February 1862 at Granby Street Church, Norfolk, Virginia. In November 1862, he was sent to the hospital in Richmond, Va; before being transferred to Huguenot Springs Hospital, remaining there until June 1863, when he returned to the "Blues" for duty. He remained with the "Blues" until the end of the war. He was our 2nd Cousin, 4 times removed.


Monroe Strickland - was born in 1835, in North Carolina, son of Lewis Strickland (1802 - ) and Civil Coles (abt 1808 - ). He was age 27 on 30 May 1862, when he enlisted in Company G, 55th Infantry Regiment North Carolina. He was our Great Great Great Uncle, brother to our Great Great Grandfather Henry Strickland. The 55th Infantry Regiment North Carolina Troops was organized at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh, North Carolina, in May, 1862. Its companies were recruited in the counties of Pitt, Wilson, Wilkes, Cleveland, Burke, Catawba, Johnston, Alexander, Onslow, Franklin, and Granville. The uni t served in the Department of North Carolina, then moved to Virginia where it was assigned to General J.R. Davis' and Cooke's Brigade. It fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from Gettysburg to Cold Har bor , served in the Petersburg trenches south of the James River, and took part in the Appomattox operations. Th e regiment lost thirty-one percent of the 640 engaged at Gettysburg and fifty-nine percent of the 340 at The Wilderness . It surrendered with 4 officers and 77 men on April 9, 1865.
Marshall Strickland - was born in 1838, in North Carolina, son of Lewis Strickland (1802 - ) and Civil Coles (abt 1808 - ). He was age 23 on 31 may 1861, when he enlisted in the 24th North Carolina Infantry, Co. E "Lone Star Boys". He was wounded on 16 May 1864 at Drewry's Bluff. On 25 March 1865, he was taken prisoner at Fort Stedman, and was confined at Point Lookout, Md. on 26 March 1865. He was paroled after taking the Oath of Allegiance on 20 June 1865. He was our Great Great Great Uncle, brother to our Great Great Grandfather Henry Strickland.
John Washington Strickland - was born abt. 1836, in North Carolina, son of Lewis Strickland (1802 - ) and Civil Coles (abt 1808 - ). He was age 25 on 31 May 1861, when he enlisted in the 24th North Carolina Infantry, Co. E "Lone Star Boys". He died of disease in Camp on 10 Sept 1861. He was our Great Great Great Uncle, brother to our Great Great Grandfather Henry Strickland. His death was listed in an article posted in the "North Carolina Standard" on November 20, 1861. This posting was an open letter from William J. Clarke, Colonel Commanding 14th Regiment North Carolina Volunteers which later became the 24th North Carolina Troops.
Isaac Strickland - was born abt. 1842, in North Carolina, son of Lewis Strickland (1802 - ) and Civil Coles (abt 1808 - ). He was age 18 on 10 May 1861, when he enlisted in the 20th North Carolina Infantry, Co. H . He was wounded at the Battle of Hagerstown, Md. on 7 July 1863. He was our Great Great Great Uncle, brother to our Great Great Grandfather Henry Strickland.
William Kenneth Parker - Born in 1832, in Edgecombe Co., North Carolina. Was 30 years of age on 21 March 1862, when he enlisted in the 7th North Carolina Regiment of Cavalry, Company I (Claiborne's Partisan Rangers), as a Private. Was still on the rolls as of 1864. In early 1864 the Confederate Congress dissolved all Partisan Ranger units. The 7th Confederate Cavalry was reorganized in July 1864. Companies A, B, C, D, E, K, and L went to the 10th Georgia Cavalry, State Guard. The 10th Georgia fought south of the James River, in North and South Carolina, finally surrendering to the Army of Tennessee. They were commanded by Lt Colonel Thomas D Claiborne. Companies F, G, H, I, and M of the 7th Confederate Cavalry went to 16th Battalion North Carolina Cavalry. He was our maternal Great Great Grandfather on our Father's side.
Roswell Lindsay - Enlisted on 21 April 1861 in Company F, 21st Regiment of Virginia Infantry, Second Brigade, Jackson's Division, Second Corps; promoted to Full Corporal on 22 April 1862; killed in action on 09 August 1862 at Cedar Mountain, Va. Listed on Page 20 of John H. Worsham's book "One of Jackson's Foot Cavalry" published in 1912 by the Neale Publishing Company. In this same book on page 113 it describes "By this time the road was full of Yankees, and there was such a fight as was not witnessed during the war; guns, bayonets, swords, pistols, fence rails, rocks, etc., were used all along the line. I have heard of a "hell spot" in some battles, this surely was one. Our color bearer knocked down a Yankee with his flag staff, and was shot to death at once. One of the color guard took the flag, and he also was killed; another, Roswell S. Lindsay of F Company, bayoneted a Yankee, and was immediately riddled with balls, three going through him. Four color bearers were killed with the colors in their hands, the fifth man flung the riddled flag to the breeze, and went through the terrible battle unhurt". Roswell was the brother of our Great Great Grandmother Haseltine Lindsay.
William Riley Coldiron - Born 01 May 1839, in Lee County, Virginia. Was 22 years of age on 25 October 1861, when he enlisted in the 5th Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Company J. Mustered out on 20 October 1862, when he was then listed as serving in Co. E of 2nd Special Cavalry Kentucky Battalion. He was captured at Mt. Sterling, KY on 9 Jun 1864 during Gen. Morgan's Cavalry raid and taken to the Rock Island, IL Union prison on 27 Jun 1864, released 21 Jun 1865. He was my wife's Great Great Grandfather.
First Georgia Regiment State Line: History
Following the abortive Andrew's raid on the Western and Atlantic Railroad, Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown realized the need for a permanent state army to protect the vital industry and infrastructure within the state. Gov. Brown had managed to raise several state regiments prior to this raid, only to have the Confederate government take control and ultimately remove them to far removed locations such as Virginia or Tennessee. This seemed quite unfair to Gov. Brown considering the vast contributions Georgia was making for the Cause. In any case, there was a need for a permanent military force to handle such emergencies.

When forming the two State Line infantry regiments, Gov. Brown was determined to retain control over them and refused to cede them to the Confederate government. Remarkably, Gov. Brown was able to accomplish this.

Unlike the Georgia militia or home guards, the State Line regiments were a permanent, standing force. They could not simply disband and return to their homes after a threat subsided. They were created for the purpose of protecting the Western and Atlantic Railroad and providing security within the State.

During 1864 as Sherman's armies slowly drove southward towards Atlanta, the need for men within the ranks of the Confederate Army of Tennessee became ever more pressing. Further, the need to guard a railroad that was increasingly being gobbled up by the advancing Federals became less apparent and it was decided the best use for the State Line regiments would be to place them alongside frontline Confederate regiments. So, in May 1864, the 1st Regiment, State Line Infantry, was placed under command of native Georgian, Brigadier General Marcellus A. Stovall. The 2nd Regiment Georgia State Line was placed in the ranks under the auspices of another native Georgian, Brigadier General Alfred Cumming.

Battle Record of the 1st Regt. Ga. State Line (Army of Tennessee)

New Hope Church, Ga. - May 25, 1864 Stovall's Brigade, Stewart's Div., Hood's Corps.

Kolb's Farm, Ga. - June 22, 1864. Stovall's Brig., Stewart's Div., Hood's Corps.

Battle of Atlanta - July 22, 1864. Stovall's Brig., Clayton's Div., Cheatham's Corps.

Jonesboro, Ga. - Aug. 31, 1864. Stovall's Brig., Clayton's Div., Lee's Corps.

Battle Record of 1st Regt. Ga. State Line (State service)
Griswoldsville, Ga. - Nov. 22, 1864. State Line Brigade, Gen. Philips commanding forces.

Honey Hill, SC. - Nov. 30, 1864. State Line Brig. Gen. Robertson commanding forces.

Savannah, Ga. - Dec. 10-21, 1864. State Line Brig. Lt. Gen Hardee commanding forces.

Girard, Ala. - Apl 16, 1865. Consolidated State Line Regt.


References

Bragg, William Harris. Joe Brown's Army - The Georgia State Line, 1862-1865. Macon, Georgia: Mercer, 1987.

McKay, John E. "The Blue Ridge Rangers from Dahlonega, Georgia were part of Governor Joseph Brown's unique 'State Army'." America's Civil War. May 1999: 74+.

"Georgia Civil War Soldiers Index", in association with GaGen Web Archives

Muster Rolls of the Georgia State Line. Georgia Department of Archives and History. Atlanta, Georgia.

National Archives and Records Service. Compiled Service Records Showing Service of Military Units in Confederate Organizations. Microfilm Rolls M266 (#151 and #166).

Sifakis, Stewart. Compendium of the Confederate Armies: South Carolina and Georgia. New York: 1995.

United States War Department. War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Washington D.C. : Government Printing Office, 1880 - 1900.

Walters, John "Norfolk Blues - The Civil War Diary of the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues", Burd Street Press 1997


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